CDC in line to replace government’s tracking of childhood vaccine safety

The CDC has changed the way it tracks the safety of children’s vaccines. It has ditched the Department of Health and Human Services’s system and has developed one, of its own, specifically to track…

CDC in line to replace government’s tracking of childhood vaccine safety

The CDC has changed the way it tracks the safety of children’s vaccines. It has ditched the Department of Health and Human Services’s system and has developed one, of its own, specifically to track vaccines for the two most common viruses: pneumococcal disease and shingles. The new system offers a unique snapshot of how shots that are taken by mouth by children who are under 6 years old to protect them against pneumococcal disease have been administered throughout the United States.

The CDC’s research is a quantitative assessment of the states that have administered vaccination records for pertussis, hepatitis A, measles, mumps, mumps-rubella, polio, tetanus, pertussis and measles since 2014. Pertussis, a disease characterized by a springtime cough, is on the rise in the United States, making up 22 percent of cases reported to the CDC from 2012 through 2018. Measles cases, which number around 600 per year, largely involve children born in Europe and who had not been exposed to the measles virus outside of their native country. When a new measles case is reported to the CDC, it’s often due to a case for which it was overdue. Shingles is a severe form of shingles that causes blisters and inflammation of the skin. People who live in the United States without sufficient inoculations against measles, rubella and tetanus are at risk of developing shingles.

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