Dimming eyes: The daily shunt of your contact lenses

You may think you looked perfectly fine at the grocery store with those novelty contact lenses you and your friends wound up getting at the last minute. Even so, you might notice a few…

Dimming eyes: The daily shunt of your contact lenses

You may think you looked perfectly fine at the grocery store with those novelty contact lenses you and your friends wound up getting at the last minute. Even so, you might notice a few extra wrinkles just above your eyes.

“I almost got the jitters and had to stop by my eye doctor,” 55-year-old Linda Yang of Gaithersburg, Md., told the New York Times after her second visit to an eye doctor in recent months.

Yang’s contact lenses — tied to seven false sight-loss cases and three earlier with minor blurred vision — were removed from her eyes after the second consultation. “They looked sort of freakish,” she said.

Yang isn’t alone. According to the NYT, the number of people with contact lenses who wind up calling in their surgeons to take them out has jumped fivefold over the past 20 years.

The Times says:

In a 2015 report to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which does not estimate the overall number of contact lens wearers, researchers at the University of Michigan’s school of public health identified the procedures — estimated to cost $71 a pop, on average — as among the more common (behind breast reduction, at $387 apiece) of emergency procedures at ambulatory surgery centers. They found that, after removing lenses that had suffered from small tears, about two-thirds of patients presented to the surgeon. Only 0.1 percent of the cases involved patients whose contact lenses had gone completely “blind,” though nearly 300 cases of severe tears were recovered.

Reuters said there was one fewer procedure to remove lenses than the week before.

All you need to wear a contact lens during the day is water and cotton swabs. As is typical, this piece of personal hygiene is compromised by the inserting of a small piece of glass near the inner eyeball.

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