Meet the professor who made the ‘white’ controversy front page news: Zena Morris

White professor Zena Morris has found herself in the news quite a bit lately for an appearance she made on Meet the Press in which she discussed “hispanic” culture, poverty, and immigration, and how…

White professor Zena Morris has found herself in the news quite a bit lately for an appearance she made on Meet the Press in which she discussed “hispanic” culture, poverty, and immigration, and how Americans have historically accepted white supremacy.

As Washingtonian.com noted, Morris got into a war of words with Joy Reid of MSNBC’s The Reid Report, when she suggested that White people have been “a force in society for many years … and [be] asked to leave?” referring to the protesters who occupied Ferguson, Missouri, and other parts of the United States in 2014 after Michael Brown’s shooting death by a police officer.

“Do you expect them to leave? You think they’re going to leave,” Reid asked Morris, who argued that “other segments of the population, and not just white people,” have been given the right to voice their opinions — but her white colleagues weren’t being allowed to.

See the clip from Meet the Press below.

In an interview with New Jersey Voice, Morris explained that her remarks were actually more appropriate for a black community (where the issues were “transcendent”), and were misinterpreted by the media. But that doesn’t change the fact that she was very forthright in laying out a sentiment with which she’s often been disagreed.

“On this show we wanted to talk about the fact that even in the black community it’s not necessarily the typical response to a racist comment, that they turn it into a ‘Keep calm and carry on’ mentality,” Morris told New Jersey Voice. “We’re always somewhat in what if they got to raise the wall against the Kardashians? For white people, it’s always ‘This is a white person talking, what do you expect?’”

Some of the reaction to her comments came in the form of character assassination. In the absence of better journalism, she suggested she turned to social media to get the word out. “And so in a Twitter-dominated landscape, more generally it allows you to publicly express your opinion, and you never know how that will take shape,” she told New Jersey Voice.

Read the full story at New Jersey Voice.

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