New book explores ways to get through divorce. Here’s how for coping with divorce, winter holidays.

Americans celebrate winter holidays with food, drink and family. For a lot of divorced people, though, the holidays can be particularly difficult. New York author Taniya Nayak details some ways to navigate the holidays…

New book explores ways to get through divorce. Here's how for coping with divorce, winter holidays.

Americans celebrate winter holidays with food, drink and family. For a lot of divorced people, though, the holidays can be particularly difficult. New York author Taniya Nayak details some ways to navigate the holidays and cope with the after-effects of a split, including family conflicts, issues with keeping relationships on track and lack of fun. Nayak offers insights and strategies on how to handle the difficult times.

The term “holiday” is not the same as the “holiday season.”

Although the holidays have multiple, overlapping periods of time, they really begin over a week and a half before the actual holiday and end on New Year’s Eve, a timeframe that changes every year. In general, the holidays change more as you get older — more so than as you move from childhood to adulthood.

“The holidays are the juxtaposition of what you have in your life now with what you want, with people, with parties, what you’re celebrating, the sentiment that goes along with the holidays, the holidays themselves,” Nayak says.

Making the holidays a positive experience after divorce is no easy task. Here’s how Nayak deals with the ups and downs.

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