Why it’s imperative for grocery stores to label plant-based products with the right kind of protein

Hedonism, the radical undertaking of standing on one’s own, which is manifestly inconsistent with today’s world, is on the rise in terms of the diets of this generation. This sort of self-imposed puny buffiness…

Hedonism, the radical undertaking of standing on one’s own, which is manifestly inconsistent with today’s world, is on the rise in terms of the diets of this generation. This sort of self-imposed puny buffiness is being eclipsed by plant-based protein.

It’s coming on strong, as a matter of fact, and the compound in its raw or paste form provides much of what many consumers crave in their food. I’m talking about so-called “plant-based protein”—the protein we eschew to make room for free-range chicken or falafel.

Whether these vegan foods would ever be considered adequate or acceptable substitutes for meat without the environmental damages or flavor/quality associated with meat, I’m not sure. At least not to the satisfaction of vegetarians and those of us on a health kick. So I’m not the one asking them to be better vegetarians. Nor am I asking the store owners to change. I’m simply challenging them to differentiate plant-based protein from non-plant-based protein—the foods that are really gaining popularity as a result of growing awareness of the planet and its inhabitants.

But I will challenge the organizations that these “plant-based protein” products are marketed to, that struggle to make a living in this economy, because I do feel that misleading their customers is a contributor to the horrible health consequences of their consuming this stuff.

Be aware of what you are getting, okay? That is the rub.

Like I said, some people’s goal is to buy the least carbon-tying plant-based protein products possible, even those offered by ethical retailers. It’s all for the spirit of the movement and to make a statement about the culture—of vegetarians and vegans alike. But what is being, shall we say, “free-ruled” is good food from organic farms: grass-fed beef, pigs, chickens, fish. Perhaps a handful of organic milk cows, but certainly not much more.

If you do eat such “plant-based protein” products, or want to eat plant-based products, make sure the “commodities” you are trying to avoid are separated from the “non-foods.” It’s as simple as that.

Given that more and more people are living lives devoid of meat, I do wish that consumers are doing more to get involved and care about animal welfare. I do wish that more people were diligent in trying to find out how their meat came from and how it was produced—even while that “meat” still came from a human.

One of the things that concerns me most about what is going on with the meat industry is the lack of transparency—the absence of standardized, written guidelines that employers have to abide by when it comes to communicating with their workers and making it clear about the factors and goals that went into an animal’s slaughter.

I’m happy when I know that an employer is clearly willing to play by the rules because they’re comfortable they’re handling the situation with dignity and compassion. But who would want to work for an employer who doesn’t do that?

I’m not saying you have to donate a day a week to animal welfare. Far from it. I just want you to be mindful of what you are consuming that is sourced from animals, whether it’s animal meat or animal parts.

Feed your body, not your heart, what it needs in order to maintain its health and be on the path to living as a sound person.

Leave a Comment